Wednesday, 4 October 2006

Update on INJECTION


Please note that the Video in the previous post does not represent my opinion as I am like everyone else, still do not know who committed this CRIME.
Be warned the video is about 1 Hour 20 minutes long and can be very upsetting.

The main website has a bigger size video if you prefer.

http://www.INJECTIONTHEMOVIE.COM

8 comments:

The colors of Life said...

Hii :
i saw the injection vidio and i thank you for puting it for us , every body should see that vidio .. really

BeSHeSHeNtRa... said...

yah i goes with: the colors of life ..thnx 4 the vidio ..its is really sad story at so many levels ..to bad :-(

AngloLibyan said...

thanks the color of life & beshentra for your comments.

Ghazi Gheblawi said...

Azizi AngloLibyan I had the chance last night to watch the documentary, the issues that it raises are important, I found the reuse of injections in Africa a horrifying one, and if the figure of 30% of HIV, AIDS in Africa and Asia is due to healthcare causes then this should at the top of the agenda of each government in the world.
I find raising the issue of the Bulgarian nurses’ case in Libya in the documentary, in the context of the problems of healthcare problems in Africa, and the reuse of injections, inconsistent.
Mr. Grant tried to prove the innocence of the Bulgarian nurses without looking to the evidence that supports their conviction, his presentation of the case was full of bias, not mentioning the interviews he conducted with people who either have rivalry with the Libyan regime (the supposed opposition, with their weird theories), or unknown human rights activists who kept repeating the same old stuff about terrorism and bombings and so on, or friends and relatives of the nurses. The only person he interviewed and had scientific credibility was the Italian Doctor, who didn't confirm 100% the innocence of the nurses.
The situation of the Libyan AIDS children is appalling and what happened to them can not be explained by just contamination or poor healthcare in Libya. It will remain one of the biggest question marks, as how this tragedy happened, and I guess at the end it will be resolved peacefully.
I think that blaming someone or pointing fingers will never bring back health and wellbeing to these innocent children, which I think our efforts and concerns should be focused on them, but at least it will serve as reminder to how things can get wrong due to negligence and ignorance... Ghazi

AngloLibyan said...

Dear Ghazi, thank you for your input.
I have an open mind on this case, i have not seen any evidence to convict the nurses yet im not sure about their innocence on the other hand as you mentioned, its the subject of shring needles that is horrifying and could be to blame, I still think that an international court should be set up for this appalling crime.
yes the documentary concentrated too much on the nurses and yet again the west seems to be standing just with the nurses yet the poor children are being AGAIN kept in the background, i agree with you, at the end of the day courts can decide who is guilty or not but the world concern and focus should be more on these children, showing crying relatives of the Bulgarian nurses is ok but is taking attention away from the real victims here.
Allah bless the children and their families.

cindymon said...

why can i put the vidio on my blog? :((

AngloLibyan said...

I had the video on my blog then I had to remove it as apparently sometimes google video can interfere with blogger and cause the blog to dislay funny, after i removed it all is well now with the display.
you can easily copy its html and paste it on your blog.

Mickey Grant said...

I appreciate any comments regarding my film and like to respond to some of them, both good ones and bad.
I have a hard time understanding why Azizi thought my findings were inconsistant with the overall problem I addressed which has to do with safe health care in Africa. When I started this film I knew nothing about the case of the children in Libya. I needed a case study for my film. Many of the experts who were supporting the theory of the safe health care problem to be more than the 2-5% which the WHO insist it is were very well versed on HIV outbreaks in the past such as one in Russia. I decided to approach the problem in Libya as it was a very active story. It appeared the outbreak was mostly from syringe reuse. As stated in the film, the WHO actually investigated prior to the nurses being arrested and concluded this was the case. Libya asked the WHO to make the report secret which they did. Therefore, I don't think there is much inconsistence between my findings and the WHO. Next the Libyan authorities started arresting many different medical workers from different countries. These workers had no idea what potential charges were going to be made against them. Eventually they arrested Kristiana who tells much of the story of her arrest in my film. She had bags of blood for transfussions in her refrigerator. You have to understand that the nurses and doctors in Libya often have to buy medical supplies on the black market. The refrigeration unit in Kristiana's clinic didn't work, that's why they were in her refrigerator. What is even more amazing, she didn't even work at the children's hospital. Later the Libyan authorities would state that these bags contained the deadly HIV which had been given to them by "John the English." It was also over a year before the nurses were told of their charges. I did try to look at the evidence the Libyans used and that's why I interviewed the lawyer of the nurses. I went to Libya and tried with an open mind to interview people but that's impossible as Libya is a totalitarian state under kaddafi. Next to no journalist I know of has ever been allowed to do real interviews with the families of the children. I went to Rome where many of the children were being treated for that purpose and I found that the only way the families could participate in an interview was if a Libyan Agent was present and they were too scared to do that. Since I wasn't allowed to do any interviews in Libya I then searched for a nurse who had worked in Benghazi. It took me a year. She verified the problem of not having medical supplies such as syringes. Also, she verified that the nurses had complained from the start about having to reuse syringes 50 or more times. The Libyan authorities threatened them if they continued to complain. The Libyan authorities were fully aware of these bad practices. In fact, even the WHO told them. There is not a "big question mark" as Azizi puts it. kaddafi is a micro-manager in his dictatorial style. There is no question that he had an awareness of what he was doing. When doing an investigation such as this one, it is not only the scientific person such as Dr. Colizzi that counts, it's also the eye witnesses which included this nurse and the WHO.

Mr. Azizi also attacked the human rights activist in my film as unknown. Rick Halperin is on the board of Amnesty International. Nearly every year Libya under kaddafi Libya is one of the greatest violators of human rights.

Mr. Azizi also says that pointing the finger at someone will not do any good. Well, someone is responsible for this tragedy. Pointing the finger at that someone will help prevent this tragedy from being repeated some day. I say some day because the HIV outbreak in Libya is enormous compared to the approximately 3,000 cases that Libya says exist. There are other hospitals in Libya with the same type of outbreak and are unknow to the public and likely to the patients. Remember, this is a country that asked the WHO to classify the true report that indicated that the over 400 children got HIV from unsafe health practices (not a CIA plot lead by the nurses}. I personally would estimate the outbreak in Libya to be over 100,000 cases. kaddafi is a man who does not want to deal with the truth, that's why he had the WHO report classified. The Bulgarian attorney discovered intelligence about the other outbreaks and the court questioned him for hours as to who told him. This is serious stuff. I believe the entire reason for blaming the nurses is a cover-up to prevent the Libyan population from discovering how bad their health care situation has been and currently is.

My efforts in making the film ultimately are focused on the Libyan children but not only the childen in Benghazi. Likely thousands of Libyan children have HIV and kaddafi has made this knowledge "classified" just as he did in the WHO report. I spent a great deal of time focusing on the nurses as it's critical to realize the truth, that they did not do this rediculously invented story of a CIA plot. The reason I first interviewed the families of the nurses and their former instructors and co-workers is that I wanted to find out if they were the kind of people who could do the horrible thing the court accused them of in the first place.

When I started this film project I had no bias for or against kaddafi. Now, I do have bias after all the discoveries I made. I purposely don't capitalize his name so as to add insult to this killer. He is the one who should have been sentenced to death. He is the one who killed the Libyan children. There are no fair courts in Libya. He controls everything. I'll never forget when I was asked in Libya not to say his name but refer to him as "the leader." What an ego. I believe that even this very day likely several more Libyan now have HIV as a result of the medical practices created by his rule. When it comes to the lives of these children, I'm sorry, but I get very direct and strong with my words.